More than a game with Seth Curry, Philadelphia 76ers


While many of us are missing live events, we’ll give students a unique behind-the-scenes experience of a sports property and learn about all of the different careers that exist in the world of professional basketball. Join Olympic Gold Medalist and KPMG Learning Ambassador, Laurie Hernandez, and NBA player, Seth Curry, on a trip to Philadelphia!


Video transcript

Laurie Hernandez: Hey there. My name is Laurie Hernandez. I'm an Olympic gold medalist for team USA and proud to champion literacy and learning efforts with my friends at KPMG. I'd like to take you all on a little journey, one we can learn from and apply to our own lives, and learn from some special guests from across the country and space.

Seth Curry: Welcome to Philadelphia's home court.

Krystal Joy Brown: Welcome to Broadway.

Leland Melvin: Welcome to the International Space Station.

Laurie Hernandez: Welcome to Costa Mesa.

John Rost: Welcome to Crown Holdings.

Laurie Hernandez: This is KPMG virtual field trips. Sports play a huge role in American culture but don't be mistaken, sports aren't just games. They're important parts of how we learn to interact with one another especially when integrated into our school system.Sports encourage teamwork and cooperation, promote physical fitness,develop sportsmanship and foster socialization.

Today, we won't be talking about my favorite sport, Gymnastics. We'll be talking about Basketball. Let's dive into a little history. Basketball originated in 1891, when James Naismith, a young physical education teacher in Springfield, Massachusetts was asked to invent a new game that could be played indoors during cold winter months and keep students out of trouble. But with limited resources, that was a difficult ask.

He found two bushel baskets that were used for carrying peaches and nailed them to the balcony at opposite ends of the gym. He handed his students a soccer ball and told them to try and toss it into the basket of the other team. Just after the game of basketball was invented in 1891, the game was introduced in schools across the country. Sports were segregated with white and black individuals playing on separate teams and separate leagues. Later racial integration of the National Basketball League in the 1940s and the National Basketball Association in 1950, enabled individuals to play in these leagues regardless of their skin color to drive inclusion and advancement of the game. As time went on, basketball developed nto a sport to be played at a professional level. New rules like goal tending, the 24 second shot clock, and a three point line were introduced to make the game more fair and more exciting to fans.

Excitement over the sport saw the formation of the National Basketball Association in 1949, and the Women's National Basketball Association in 1997. The growth in popularity of the two leagues was fueled by their superstar players like Larry Bird, Bill Walton, Wilt Chamberlain Kareem Abdul Jabbar, Maya Moore, Michael Jordan, Sue Bird and LeBron James.Basketball has so much to teach us and there are so many practical ways to apply what you're learning in school to professional sports. You've just got to get your head in the game. Today we're heading to Philadelphia's arena to visit one of basketball's original franchises, The 76'ers. We'll hear from Seth Curry about what it's like to play professionally and learn how subjects like Math, English and science helped bring him his A game. Let's go!

Seth Curry: Welcome to Philadelphia's home court originally opened and established August 31st, 1996. Three teams call this place home, my team Philadelphia 76'ers, The NHL Philadelphia Flyers and the National Lacrosse League's Philadelphia Wings.

Let me show you around a bit. First up, we have the main stage of the basketball arena the court, this the spot that gets all the attention and you'd be surprised how much goes into putting on an NBA game. Over here we have the scores table where the keepers tally the points and keep track of the shot clock. All those numbers don't appear by themselves. Additionally this table has statisticians and sometimes live commentators for the TV and radio broadcast. If we head off the court, we'll find the locker room. This is where the team can change, shower and strategize before and after the game. We'll hear from our coach about how we can improve our game and we'll encourage our teammates. The locker room houses all sorts of equipment that helps us play our best, including dry erase boards, jerseys personal training equipment and of course, basketballs.

Now for a bit of a look behind the scenes of the arena video production, while the game is being played there needs to be several cameras around the arena to capture all sorts of different angles. These ultimately end up on the video boards and the jumbotron to get fans a lot closer look at the action. If we take a look way up near the top of the aren we'll find the press box. This is where we might find the end game announcer, certain staff members of the teams and certain members of the press like journalists photographers and videographers.

If we head outside of the arena for The Concourse, we'll find all sorts of places to eat. In addition to a wide variety of concessions, we'll find large communal eating area. Another part of the Concourse is the box office where fans can buy tickets to all of the different events that happen at our home arena. As you can see, there's a lot that goes on in this big arena. So next time you're watching a basketball game just remember there's a whole lot of action beyond the court.

Laurie Hernandez: Now that we've got some background on the 76'ers arena, let's ask Seth a few questions.

Krystal Joy Brown: Hey Seth, did your parents encourage you to participate in sports?

Seth Curry: Yeah, they definitely occurred to me to participate in as many sports as possible, not just one, not just playing basketball they wanted me to play all types of different sports and learn which ones I was the best at, which ones I liked the most so whatever I put my time and energy into that was the one I was most passionate about.

Leland Melvin: Hey Seth have you ever beaten Steph one-on-one?

Seth Curry: I've beat my brother, Stephan on one-on-one plenty of times growing up in the backyard and even in the summer when we work out, some very fun heated one-on-one games. We were very competitive growing up me and my brother and my sister, really our entire family we're a sports family and we all got that competitive edge to us.

Laurie Hernandez: Hey Seth, what's your favorite thing about playing in Philadelphia?

Seth Curry: Favorite thing about playing in Philadelphia has definitely been the fans. You hear so much about them, playing against them throughout the years, and then before the season you hear how they're one of the best fan bases in the country, in the world really. And they're really passionate about their team, even though they haven't been the stands for the majority of the year, you can still feel their energy and how much they want to bring a championship back to the city.

John Rost: What do you do during the off season?

Seth Curry: During the off season outside of obviously working out and trying to stay in the best shape as possible, I like to relax. Spend a lot of time with my family, play golf, hunt, fish, just do everything to take my mind off the game, while relaxing, but at the same time just having the most fun as possible.

Darnell Abraham: Hey Seth, what's your favorite memory you've made playing in the NBA?

Seth Curry: My favorite memory playing in NBA so far has been the um three point shoot out when it was in Charlotte, back in my hometown being able to just participate in that event with my family in the stands and a lot of friends and family in the city during that, that weekend was a lot of fun.

John Rost: Hey, Seth has playing sports had an impact on you as a person?

Seth Curry: Playing sports impacted me as a person just being able to learn how to deal with teammates and to know how to be around a lot of different types of people and work together to accomplish one goal. Playing basketball over the years has definitely translated to different things off the court, as far as working with teams in school and business all types of different areas. Definitely have to have a discipline to be the best you can be as a teammate, as a player. And like I said, that translates over to different things off the courts.

Krystal Joy Brown: Seth was there a time in your life where you had a challenge or obstacles you had to overcome?

Seth Curry: I've had to overcome some challenges in my life as far as dealing with injuries, playing sports and and have some setbacks when I'm not being drafted out of college and NBA. Sometimes you can get down on yourself but it's about staying motivated, staying positive, believing in your abilities and working hard to overcome those challenges in the long run.

Us as a whole, as a country and every person individually is going through a lot of obstacles right now, facing different challenges. I think you just need to learn to adapt to your situation, to your circumstances and not get discouraged, not get down on yourself but figure out ways to overcome those obstacles. The impact that that pandemic has had on playing in the NBA in general, for one, we haven't had fans in the arena so you have to kind of bring your own energy and play with that emotion even with the fans not in the arena. And yep, just adjust to the circumstances be able to adapt and to, to do your job.

Leland Melvin: Hey Seth, how are you and the 76'ers involved in your community?

Seth Curry: Myself and the 76'ers organization as a whole try to do as much as possible in the community. Me personally, I like to try to impact the kids and the younger generation as much

as possible, as far as putting in afterschool programs or different things outside of the curriculum that students or even myself didn't have. So try to do as much as possible to, to give back and show face as much as possible and, just give them some motivation.

Laurie Hernandez: How can students be involved in sports with expertise in math?

Seth Curry: Well, some ways that students can be involved in sports on the mathematic side is, definitely as far as learning stats and understanding analytics, I know it's becoming a bigger part of sports in general, trying to analyze the game using numbers and not just the eye test, but to see who's a good player, who needs to work on different things, things you can get better at.

John Rost: Hey Seth, how can students be involved in sports with expertise in science?

Seth Curry: Some ways that students can be involved with sports with expertise in science would definitely be on the physical therapy side. We're learning more and more about our bodies and how you need to be in shape and how you need to be healthy to perform (indistinct) once you get on the court so, on the science side, just learning about physical therapy, getting in shape, helping overcome injuries and plenty of people to help us on the science side not just on the court.

Darnell Abraham: How can students who like english be involved in sports?

Seth Curry: As a student you can be involved in sports with the expertise in English by telling an individual player stories by being a sports writer, coming up with creative cool ways to go to a game, and just all the entertainment aspect.

John Rost: What is your favorite subject in school and why?

Seth Curry: My favorite subject in school was probably history. Just learning about the past things that made our country and our people the way we are today. It's very interesting to me personally, and it giving me a real interest in going to school every day, reading books, trying to grow my knowledge of how we got to where we are today.

Laurie Hernandez: Wow. How cool was it to hear from Seth Curry? If all this basketball talk has got you wanting to get up and actually handle a basketball, we've got you covered. Here's how you can do it at home. All you'll need is a basketball, a hoop and some players. You don't even need a regulation basketball hoop or even a basketball to practice some of these moves. You can even use something like a trashcan and some paper.

First step, the layup. As you dribble towards the basket, you can't be looking at the ball, make sure you keep your eyes up and ready to attack the basket. You'll start your layup motion with two steps, the outside foot than the inside foot. You'll make your first step with your outside foot, which is the foot further from the basket. And then you'll jump off your inside foot which is closer to the basket. As you lay the ball in make sure to follow through to your target.

Next up passing, when you need to get the ball to a teammate you have three main options for passing. The most common is a chest pass, with your hands on the side of the ball you push it out from your chest to your target. Next up is the bounce pass where you use the ground to make your pass. As long as you get your angle right it'll bounce back up to the hands of your waiting teammate. The third pass is the overhead pass, which is used if you have the ball above your head. Simply thrust your hands forward towards your target and be sure to follow through. Even if you've never played basketball before you can quickly develop your layups and passing ability with just a little bit of practice. So get out there.

Is your head spinning from everything that you just learned about basketball? That's all good because I've got you covered with today's takeaways from the day. For one thing, sports has the ability to teach us so many valuable and important life skills like sportsmanship, teamwork, socialization, and cooperation. Not to mention that sports keep us moving and physically active.

Additionally, we learned a bit about the history of basketball, from its beginnings as a game with two peach baskets nailed to either side of the gym, to the progress of racial integration that was made in the 1940s and 50s and development of the women's league in the nineties, we've come a very long way to get to know professional basketball leagues we know and love today. We also learned about all the different parts of a basketball arena, from the court to the scores table to the locker rooms, to the press box, to the Concourse, there is so much that goes into putting on a good game. But, what's really amazing are all the ways in what you're learning in school can apply to the world of professional sports. For instance, science can be applied to sports medicine and physical therapy. Math is essential for sports statistics, analytics and bookkeeping, and writing is a very important part of sports marketing and journalism. There are so many people that have a hand in professional sports with so many different skill sets to contribute.

Well kiddos, this is where I bid you adieu, but before we say goodbye let's hear once more from Seth Curry.

Seth Curry: I know that sometimes it can be hard to connect to the things you are learning at school with your future plans. Good education is the foundation to limitless possibilities you saw on today's episode. To learn more about KPMG and its commitment to education and lifelong learning, please visit www.kpmg.us till next time.

Featured guests
 







Seth Curry

NBA Player for the Philadelphia 76ers

Seth Curry, shooting guard for the Philadelphia 76ers in the NBA, was born on August 23, 1990 in Charlotte, NC. He grew up the child of former NBA player, Dell Curry, and former Virginia Tech Women's volleyball player, Sonya Curry. Seth and his two siblings, Stephen & Sydel, followed suit to athletic prominence. His older brother Stephen is the starting point guard for the Golden State Warriors and his younger sister, Sydel, played volleyball at Elon University. Seth attended Charlotte Christian School, graduating in 2008 and was on the academic honor roll all four years. After high school, Curry chose to attend Liberty University where he broke the conference single-season scoring record as a freshman and led the nation in average points per game among all freshman. After his historic year at Liberty, Curry returned to his native North Carolina and transferred to Duke University where he garnered AII-ACC and All-American honors. Despite going undrafted following his time at Duke, Seth proved he belonged in the NBA by standing out as an All-Star in the NBA D-League early in his career. Since then, Curry has established himself as a go-to player in the NBA, playing for Sacramento, Dallas, Portland, and now Philadelphia. Over the past two seasons, Seth ranked third in the NBA in three-point shooting. In addition, currently Seth ranks second in NBA history in career three-point percentage (44.3%), behind only current Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr.

Inspired by his mother's career as a teacher, Seth has always seen the importance of youth education and community work. He created the Seth Curry Foundation to provide children with the educational and technological resources they need to succeed through unique programming. One of these programs, Venture, encourages kids to think like an entrepreneur and guides them through the journey of starting their own business. Seth, his wife and daughter, currently reside outside of Philadelphia.

 


 

Laurie Hernandez

U.S. Olympic Gold Medalist and
KPMG Literacy & Learning Champion

Since bringing home the Gold and Silver medals at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games, Laurie has gone on to win the coveted Mirror ball trophy on "Dancing with the Stars" Season 23.  Her first book titled “I Got This: To Gold and Beyond”, chronicling her journey thus far was published in 2017 and immediately made the New York Times Best Sellers list. In 2018, she released a children's picture book, “She's Got This", also a New York Times Best Seller, while serving as a Literacy Champion to promote readership as a path to leadership. Mattel also created a Laurie Hernandez "Shera" Barbie to honor her.

She is a second generation American, as her grandparents are from Puerto Rico, making her the first U.S. born Latina to make the U.S. team since 1984. Laurie is currently training to compete for a spot on the Olympic Team in Tokyo this summer.

When not in the gym, Laurie enjoys spending time with her family. Acting is one of her biggest passions and she has done cameos, voiceovers, and even co-hosted American Ninja Warrior Junior. She travels the country speaking to the next generation about following your dreams and embracing who you are. She is also a fierce advocate for the importance of Mental Health and has partnered with multiple campaigns and initiatives to encourage awareness.

Featured guests

Seth Curry

NBA Player for the Philadelphia 76ers

Seth Curry, shooting guard for the Philadelphia 76ers in the NBA, was born on August 23, 1990 in Charlotte, NC. He grew up the child of former NBA player, Dell Curry, and former Virginia Tech Women's volleyball player, Sonya Curry. Seth and his two siblings, Stephen & Sydel, followed suit to athletic prominence. His older brother Stephen is the starting point guard for the Golden State Warriors and his younger sister, Sydel, played volleyball at Elon University. Seth attended Charlotte Christian School, graduating in 2008 and was on the academic honor roll all four years. After high school, Curry chose to attend Liberty University where he broke the conference single-season scoring record as a freshman and led the nation in average points per game among all freshman. After his historic year at Liberty, Curry returned to his native North Carolina and transferred to Duke University where he garnered AII-ACC and All-American honors. Despite going undrafted following his time at Duke, Seth proved he belonged in the NBA by standing out as an All-Star in the NBA D-League early in his career. Since then, Curry has established himself as a go-to player in the NBA, playing for Sacramento, Dallas, Portland, and now Philadelphia. Over the past two seasons, Seth ranked third in the NBA in three-point shooting. In addition, currently Seth ranks second in NBA history in career three-point percentage (44.3%), behind only current Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr.

Inspired by his mother's career as a teacher, Seth has always seen the importance of youth education and community work. He created the Seth Curry Foundation to provide children with the educational and technological resources they need to succeed through unique programming. One of these programs, Venture, encourages kids to think like an entrepreneur and guides them through the journey of starting their own business. Seth, his wife and daughter, currently reside outside of Philadelphia.


 

Laurie Hernandez

U.S. Olympic Gold Medalist and KPMG Learning Ambassador

Since bringing home the Gold and Silver medals at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games, Laurie has gone on to win the coveted Mirror ball trophy on "Dancing with the Stars" Season 23.  Her first book titled “I Got This: To Gold and Beyond”, chronicling her journey thus far was published in 2017 and immediately made the New York Times Best Sellers list. In 2018, she released a children's picture book, “She's Got This", also a New York Times Best Seller, while serving as a Learning Ambassador to promote readership as a path to leadership. Mattel also created a Laurie Hernandez "Shera" Barbie to honor her.

She is a second generation American, as her grandparents are from Puerto Rico, making her the first U.S. born Latina to make the U.S. team since 1984. Laurie is currently training to compete for a spot on the Olympic Team in Tokyo this summer.

When not in the gym, Laurie enjoys spending time with her family. Acting is one of her biggest passions and she has done cameos, voiceovers, and even co-hosted American Ninja Warrior Junior. She travels the country speaking to the next generation about following your dreams and embracing who you are. She is also a fierce advocate for the importance of Mental Health and has partnered with multiple campaigns and initiatives to encourage awareness.

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